THE LOCKWOOD GALLERY | PLACES I REMEMBER: 4 DECADES OF UNFORGETTABLE LANDSCAPES

Date/Time
Date(s) - Fri, Jun 10, 2022
11:00 am-6:00 pm

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Location
Lockwood Art Gallery

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ARTISTS RECEPTION / OPENING RECEPTION
SATURDAY, MAY21st, 3-7 PM

​GALLERY DAYS & HOURS: THURSDAYS & FRIDAYS 11AM-5 PM; SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS 11AM – 6PM

SUSAN MAYR
DOROTHY ROBINSON
ALICE ZINNES

WITH SCULPTURES by RICHARD BARONIO

The landscape, a perennially engaging subject among art lovers, is the focus of Places I Remember, 4 Decades of Unforgettable Landscapes.

Of the four artists whose works are on view, three are painters: Susan Mayr, Dorothy Robinson, and Alice Zinnes, and one, Richard Baronio a sculptor. What all four have in common is an affinity for expressive abstraction which links their inner lives to the all encompassing natural world outside. Each has produced a body of work over many years that refrains from careful depiction of objective reality in favor of in-depth delineation of their personal psychological terrains. Visitors to the gallery will not find a travelog of local vistas but instead deeply felt responses to living in our time and place with inventive works grounded in landscape art.

Susan Mayr, who notes that she has “always been an urban dweller longing for mountains, forests, and trees, goes on to describe her art practice as “nature ruthlessly recalled.” Her paintings probe her memories of places she has visited that affected her profoundly, and she makes repeated attempts to get to the heart of them “to define that place sensually until the paint speaks its language.” Memory meets the moment-to-moment reality of a work revealing itself and a place remembered and shared with new visitors through Mayr’s artistic process.

Alice Zinnes has been painting for over 4 decades. Early works included observational paintings of the landscape in northeastern Pennsylvania and the Delaware Water Gap. Later she realized that she had come to the end of making this kind of work and launched into watercolors that eschewed representation in favor of more direct emotional expression. She then took up a journey into abstract oil painting. She states, “Provoked to visual explosions by fiction, poetry, and mythology, my paintings and drawings contain the spirit of the storyteller in the guise of the abstract adventurer. Not illustrations or literal translations, my art transforms ancient myths into mysterious worlds where the boundaries between underworld and waking earth are traversable, terror coexists with joy, and loss yields to renewal.” Zinnes sometimes takes years to finish a painting. She wants to get it right. She continues to make watercolors and drawings, some of which relate to the oil paintings she is working on, but stand as art works in their own right. She believes that ”through its lyricism my art asks that we value our inner selves…”

Dorothy Robinson specifically articulates that her works are “imagined landscapes inspired by the visionary art of Ryder and Burchfield and rooted in the rugged terrain of the Hudson Valley.” Though one can see gestural depictions of trees, lakes, waterfalls, mountains, and human presence in her works, these are suggestive rather than representational. Gallery goers are left with plenty of room to mentally complete Robinson’s paintings with their own content while admiring the beauty and freedom of Robinson’s deft handling of color, gesture, texture, and flowing brushwork. She reveals that “exploring [landscape] is a way for me to access memories, thoughts, and emotions that comprise an interior life including anxiety and loss experienced as we move through this era’s political and social upheavals.”

Richard Baronio’s organically evolved steel sculptures have much to add to this show’s conversation about landscape art. His thoughts about balance, symmetry and complexity vs. complication and accepting one’s self and one’s art as a small part of the universe are embodied in his work.

 

 

 

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